Is phenylalanine safe during pregnancy?

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: L-phenylalanine is LIKELY SAFE when consumed in amounts commonly found in foods by pregnant patients who have normal phenylalanine levels. But having too much phenylalanine during pregnancy can increase the chances of birth defects.

What is phenylalanine in pregnancy?

Phenylalanine is an essential amino acid that people need to obtain in their diets. Amino acids are the building blocks for protein, which is required to form tissues in the body. It is well known that pregnant women require more protein in their diets, but the exact amount for each amino acid is undetermined.

Does phenylalanine cross the placenta?

It is believed that it is during this time period that high phenylalanine and its metabolites in the mothers’ blood plasma can cross the placenta and directly effect the developing embryo by inducing birth defects.

Can you take phenylephrine while pregnant?

Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine are pregnancy category C in all three trimesters of pregnancy. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) recommend using pseudoephedrine during pregnancy.

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What artificial sweeteners are safe during pregnancy?

Sucralose: (Splenda)

It can also be used as “table-top sweetener.” Sucralose has no effect on blood sugar, offers no calories, and is deemed safe during pregnancy and lactation. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), sucralose is safe for everyone to consume, including pregnant women.

Why is there a warning for phenylalanine?

Phenylalanine can cause intellectual disabilities, brain damage, seizures and other problems in people with PKU . Phenylalanine occurs naturally in many protein-rich foods, such as milk, eggs and meat. Phenylalanine is also sold as a dietary supplement.

Why is phenylalanine in hot chocolate?

If you’ve devoured your eggs and feel guilty, don’t panic. Chocolate contains an amino acid, phenylalanine, which is involved in making dopamine, a neurotransmitter that can regulate mood. It stimulates your metabolism and nervous system, which could be why some people turn to chocolate when feeling low.

How much phenylalanine is safe?

Optimal doses of phenylalanine have not been set for any condition. Quality and active ingredients in supplements may vary widely from maker to maker. This makes it difficult to set a standard dose. However, commonly used dosages, depending on the condition, range from 150 mg to 5,000 mg daily.

Can you chew gum with phenylalanine while pregnant?

A packet or two of the blue stuff now and then is fine (so yes, a small piece of sugarless gum is safe) — just avoid consuming aspartame during pregnancy in large amounts, and steer clear of it altogether if phenylketonuria (PKU), a rare genetic disease, is on your medical chart.

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Is it OK to drink aspartame while pregnant?

Aspartame (Equal, NutraSweet) and pregnancy

Aspartame is considered safe to use during pregnancy. It’s also not secreted in breast milk, so you won’t pass it to your baby when you’re nursing. You may find, however, that aspartame gives you a headache. Don’t worry: it won’t harm you or your baby.

Can I take any decongestants while pregnant?

Stuffy nose and sinus pressure

Decongestant medications reduce stuffiness and sinus pressure by constricting the blood vessels in your nose, which reduces swelling. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine are available over the counter as Sudafed and are safe for many women to use during pregnancy.

Does phenylephrine cause birth defects?

There are no studies looking at possible risks to a pregnancy when a father takes pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine, but a father’s use of these common decongestants is not expected to cause birth defects. In general, exposures that fathers have are unlikely to increase risks to a pregnancy.

What if I took Sudafed PE while pregnant?

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A woman’s use of decongestant medications in the first trimester of pregnancy may raise her child’s risk of certain rare birth defects, according to a small study.