Quick Answer: How do I know if my baby has pyloric stenosis?

Signs include: Vomiting after feeding. The baby may vomit forcefully, ejecting breast milk or formula up to several feet away (projectile vomiting). Vomiting might be mild at first and gradually become more severe as the pylorus opening narrows.

How often does a baby with pyloric stenosis vomit?

While occasional dribbles of spit-up after meals is common in infants and usually harmless, true vomiting is more concerning. In some babies, frequent projectile vomiting can be a symptom of a condition called hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS); it occurs in 1 out of every 500 or so babies.

Do babies with pyloric stenosis poop?

Babies with pyloric stenosis usually have fewer, smaller stools (poops) because little or no food is reaching the intestines. Constipation or poop with mucus also can happen.

How do you test for pyloric stenosis?

Blood tests to check for dehydration or electrolyte imbalance or both. Ultrasound to view the pylorus and confirm a diagnosis of pyloric stenosis. X-rays of your baby’s digestive system, if results of the ultrasound aren’t clear.

How soon after eating do babies with pyloric stenosis vomit?

Symptoms start when babies are around 2 to 8 weeks old. Infants with pyloric stenosis may eat well but have these symptoms: Frequent projectile vomiting (forceful vomiting), usually within a half hour to an hour after eating. Abdominal (belly) pain.

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Can a baby have pyloric stenosis and still gain weight?

Babies with pyloric stenosis usually have fewer, smaller stools because little or no food is reaching the intestines. Constipation or stools that have mucus in them may also be symptoms. Failure to gain weight and lethargy. Most babies with pyloric stenosis will fail to gain weight or will lose weight.

What happens if pyloric stenosis goes untreated?

If left untreated, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis can cause: Dehydration. Electrolyte imbalance. Lethargy.

Are babies with pyloric stenosis fussy?

A baby with pyloric stenosis may: Vomit soon after a feeding. Have a full, swollen upper belly after a feeding. Act fussy and hungry a lot of the time.

Is pyloric stenosis an emergency?

Emergency Department Care

Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) may be described as a medical emergency or a medical urgency based on how early in the course the patient presents.

Is pyloric stenosis life threatening?

Discussion. This is a case re-affirming that infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) can present with severe electrolyte abnormalities and can be a medical emergency as seen in this patient.

Is pyloric stenosis a birth defect?

Pyloric stenosis is a birth defect. This means that your child is born with it. This condition may run in some families.